Kettlebell Snatches

Eat Less, Live Longer

I was reading an email from a friend of mine, Jinjee, and she was saying some pretty interesting things. Here's what she had to say: New research reported in New Scientist Magazine shows a newly found molecule called TOR, that is activated by protein, that causes aging. Page one of this article is about the benefits of the Calorie Restriction diet proven to increase lifespans, and page two gets in to how people following the Calorie Restriction diet should be careful not to eat too much protein or they will negate the anti-aging they have a accomplished. A few years ago an article was written in Pear Magazine that focuses on the benefit of a combination with the Calorie Restriction Diet and the Raw Vegetarian/Vegan Diet would not only give Calorie Restrictionists the highest nutrient density foods they generally seek, but would probably also be the ideal diet for extending our life span to where it is supposed to be, (according to scientific research: about 120 - 150 years). This article seems to support that idea: http://tinyurl.com/eatlesslivelong

Outside of nutrition comes activity and exercise. Of course you know I recommend Kettlebell Training and certainly for good reason. Check this out ===> Performing Kettlebell Snatches burn 20.2 calories per minute- which equals 600 kcals in only 30 min (not factoring the ongoing afterburn). This is compared to Spinning (cycling class): 14 kcals, Running a 7 minute mile (and that's pretty quick too): 19 kcals, Elliptical Trainer (and we all know these are horrible for our knees, hips, & back): 9.8, and Swimming Laps: 13.6 kcals.  -Men's Health Magazine Here's another study with very similar results: University of Wisc & American Counsel of Exercise Study
Combination of both a balanced diet of high healthy fat foods, more veggies than anything else you are eating, at least 3 no bigger than your fist size portions of fruit every day, and protein that is very easy to digest such as nuts(not legumes), seeds, beans, wild caught fish, whole pasture eggs (and eat the whole thing too), and grassfed meats you will live a longer and happier life. Notice what foods I omitted and it is for a VERY good reason. Just because you like something or that you can buy it organically does not mean it is good for you. Stick to the basics, eat less, live longer, stay close to nature in everything you consume, don't allow yourself to eat convenient processed foods, saturate your body constantly with fresh filtered water and you will be more energetic than you ever know.

The Anatomy of Kettlebell Training: The Snatch Part 2

KETTLEBELL SNATCH TECHNIQUE SERIES PART 2: PREVENTING BLISTERS

By: Coach Denis Kanygin


This is part 2 of The Anatomy of Kettlebell Training Series (read Part 1: Undersquat). Today I’d like to address a very common question: how to bring kettlebell down from lockout.

If kettlebell is brought down improperly, it will remove much skin from your palm and cause much pain and discomfort.

On the other hand, if brought down properly, kettlebell will keep hands happy and in one piece.

So, how should you bring kettlebell down from lockout in snatch lift so that it does not rip skin off of your hand?

The key to happy hands during kettlebell snatches is proper transition of grip

  • In lockout, lifter’s hand is pushed all the way through kettlebell handle
  • As kettlebell is brought down, grip changes to hook grip (like during kettlebell swings)

So, how should we switch from having hand through kettlebell to hook grip?

  • As the bell is falling down, relax your grip so that as the bell rotates there is 0 (zero) friction between hand and handle
  • ‘Catch’ kettlebell roughly at chest level with hook grip

This way, you will avoid pinching skin by kettlebell handle and minimize friction between handle and hand.

Less friction between kettlebell handle and hand means less blistering and less pain (don’t worry, you will feel pain in other parts of your body).

Here is a demonstration of how this transition should be done:


Enjoy and let me know how it goes.

Part 1 of our series The Anatomy of Kettlebell Training, by Bob Garon featuring The Swing, can be viewed HERE.

Part 2 of our series The Anatomy of Kettlebell Training, by Coach Denis Kanygin featuring The Snatch: Undersquat, can be viewed HERE.

About Coach Denis Kanygin: For the last 10 years, Coach Denis has been sharing his kettlebell training knowldege based in GS (Kettlebell Sport) with thousands of people.

Coach Denis is now a Technical and Kettlebell Sport Advisor to IKFF. He was responsible for creating new kettlebell sport rankings for IKFF (see Story of IKFF Sport Rankings). Coach Kanygin is now teaching his kettlebell training methodology based in pure Russian GS training methods coupled with his experience as postural therapist.

Coach Denis blogs here: http://www.workoutiq.com/blog/

 

Feel free to leave your questions in comments below.

The Anatomy of Kettlebell Training: The Snatch Part 1

Kettlebell Snatch Technique Series, Part 1: Undersquat

By: Coach Denis Kanygin

 

Kettlebell snatch is one of my favorite lifts. It is also one of the more technical and challenging lifts to do correctly.

I get many questions about snatches and as a result I decided to write these series about Kettlebell Snatch technique.

This is Part 1 of the series. It deals entirely with using an ‘undersquat’ element in snatch.

So, undersquat: is it friend or enemy?

To make it a bit more clear, I will address the following questions:

  • What is ‘undersquat’?
  • What is the purpose of undersquat in kettlebell snatch lift?
  • How is undersquat element used in snatch lift?
  • What are the Pros and Cons of using the undersquat element?
  • Why do some lifters use and some do not?
  • Is undersquat for me?

What is ‘undersquat’ when applied to kettlebell snatches?
Undersquat is a dip performed as the bell is brought up into the lockout position. Here is a demonstration of a the undersquat as it is applied to kettlebell snatches:

What is the purpose of undersquat in kettlebell snatch lift?

The purpose of the undersquat is to make kettlebell snatch lift easier. Perhaps ‘easier’ is the wrong word but it will help you to get the kettlebell in the lockout position.

Using undersquat in snatches is very similar to using second dip in kettlebell jerks. Lifter ends up getting under the bell so the bell does not have to be lifted as high.

Similarly to jerks, when I snatch the bell, I can get under the bell by dipping (undersquat). Such strategy conserves energy and allows lifter to complete the snatch lift when he/she is unable to bring the bell high enough to lockout.

How is undersquat element used in snatch lift?
So how and when should I use the undersquat? All the time and on every rep? When I get tired? What is the proper use?

What are the Pros and Cons of using the undersquat element?

Pros

  • Allows to complete the lift when lifter is extremely tired and is unable to bring kettlebell to proper hight
  • Conserves overall energy

Cons

  • Slows down the pace of the lift
  • Puts more demand on legs muscles

Why do some lifters use ‘undersquat’ during snatch lift while others do not?
Some lifters are so strong, they have no need for the help of undersquat. These guys and gals can survive 10 minutes of snatches without ever needing to get under the bell.

Other lifters use this technique closer to the end of their competition set. A perfect example of this strategy is Jonny Benidze, Russian lifter who snatched 32kg bell 165 reps at the body weight of 60kg (roughly 120lb).

To see how Jonny uses the ‘undersquat’, watch the last 30 seconds of the clip below.

Is there a point to using ‘undersquat’ on every repetition? That largely depends on your fitness level, pace that you are going for and the kettlebell weight.

Is undersquat for me?
Undersquat should definitely be in your arsenal of strategies when it comes to snatches.

Try this technique, practice it.

Ask yourself whether this is a suitable strategy for you, given your

  • fitness level
  • flexibility
  • lower back strength
  • leg strength

If you feel like you are unable to bring the bell high enough to lockout, it may be a good time to use this technique.

Play with it, practice it, learn it and use it.

Good luck.

Let me know how it goes. Look forward to your comments and feedback.

Part 1 of our series The Anatomy of Kettlebell Training, by Bob Garon featuring The Swing, can be viewed HERE.

About Coach Denis Kanygin: For the last 10 years, Coach Denis has been sharing his kettlebell training knowldege based in GS (Kettlebell Sport) with thousands of people.

Coach Denis is now a Technical and Kettlebell Sport Advisor to IKFF. He was responsible for creating new kettlebell sport rankings for IKFF (see Story of IKFF Sport Rankings). Coach Kanygin is now teaching his kettlebell training methodology based in pure Russian GS training methods coupled with his experience as postural therapist.

Coach Denis blogs here: http://www.workoutiq.com/blog/